Goodwill and Google

Goodwill’s New Career Center

By SF Goodwill

Each year, more than 4,000 people with barriers to employment turn to Goodwill to find or regain economic self-sufficiency. The majority of these job seekers begin at the Career Center, where they can access one-on-one career coaching and job placement services; job readiness training; digital learning classes; workshops on resume writing and interview skills; and job boards with immediate employer openings.

Now, job seekers will be better served in their search at SF Goodwill’s new Career Center, recently opened at 99 Kissling Street (at 11th Street) in the heart of the Mission neighborhood. The Career Center provides a robust platform for job seekers who are struggling to find a first job or their first job in a long time.

Along with the job and career readiness services offered at the previous location, the new Career Center provides a full slate of innovative programming and enhanced services. For example, job seekers can sign up for LinkedIn Learning, where they receive a free license (a $275 value) for unlimited access to more than 6,000 courses in technology and business taught by industry experts. In addition, new social services and educational partners are located on site, including Human Services Agency (offering benefits counseling), and San Francisco City College (providing orientations and coaching for individuals interested in pursuing post-secondary educational opportunities).

“Goodwill Industries Comprehensive Access Point Career Center serves as a central hub for workforce services in San Francisco,” says Janan Howell, the Director of Sector and Workforce Initiatives for the City & County of San Francisco. “In addition to providing a wide array of employment services, the center effectively coordinates with other service providers to offer information on education, public assistance and employer-related events. Through this streamlined program model, job seekers citywide have direct access to multiple opportunities to enhance upward mobility.”

Jobs.